Tuesday, May 15, 2018

On the Value of Short Words, and a Give-Away

courtesy google images
"There is a story that an American general once asked Churchill to look over the draft of an address he had written. It was returned with the comment: 'Too many passives and too many zeds.' The general asked him what he meant, and was told: 'Too many Latinate polysyllabics like systematize, prioritize and finalize. And then the passives. What if I had said, instead of 'We shall fight on the beaches,' 'Hostilities will be engaged with our adversary on the coastal perimeter'?'"   --Winston Churchill (source)

Short words vs. long words (monosyllabic vs. polysyllabic): they both have their place, of course, but often--as Winston Churchill, Britain's great leader and prime minister during WWII, so artfully displayed--the scale of good communication tips more toward the punchiness and action of short words as opposed to the more flowery, lofty nature of long ones. Do you agree?

George Orwell weighed in on the subject, too: "Never use a long word where a short one will do. Never use the passive where you can use the active."

As mentioned in an earlier post (here), I answered a call to write for an anthology in which the main criteria was that we were to write in only one syllable words (with a few exceptions like prepositions, proper names, and words for family). Writing for this volume was not only rewarding in that my piece was accepted for the collection, but because the challenge itself provided opportunity to stretch the writing muscles in a different way. 

Thus, I'm happy to share in the good news that the book is out! The Short and Sweet of It, When the Right Word is a Short Word, compiled and edited by Susan Cheeves King (Grace Publishing, Broken Arrow OK 2018). As an anthology of inspirational pieces, the book is designed to encourage and uplift the reader. From the back cover: "How do we say more with less? Can short, simple words make what we write so clear that the reader gets it? Or will it remind them of reading a child's board book? The truth is, short words bring power because they are easy to read, easy to grasp, and easy to recall...In this book, the third in the Short and Sweet series, you'll find a collection of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry on a variety of topics. They have two things in common: Each is about something that matters deeply to the writer, and with few exceptions, each is written using only one-syllable words or words of fewer than six letters. If you've always thought writers have to use long words to keep readers engaged, discover why it's often a great idea to keep it Short and Sweet."

Short and Sweet! Maybe you'd like to take a peek between the covers and see what a few writers have done with a few short words. And so a give-away! I will send a copy out to a commenter-chosen-by-random. All you have to do is comment here by May 28, at which time I will do a random drawing and send a copy out to that person. Just leave a contact email so that I can be in touch to get your address :-)

Who knows, maybe then, too, you will be inspired to see just how far a few short words can go!

And here, a bonus of extra words of wisdom from Winston Churchill. See if any of these quotes stir you on to more words of your own, too--or maybe simply be an encouragement for the moment:  

  • "Every day you may make progress. Every step may be fruitful. Yet there will stretch out before you an ever-lengthening, ever-ascending, ever-improving path. You know you will never get to the end of the journey. But this, so far from discouraging, only adds to the joy and glory of the climb."
  • "Success is not final, failure is not fatal. It is the courage to continue that counts."
  • "Writing a book is an adventure. To begin with it is a toy then an amusement. Then it becomes a mistress, and then it becomes a master, and then it becomes a tyrant and, in the last stage, just as you are about to be reconciled to your servitude, you kill the monster and fling him to the public."
  • "All the greatest things are simple, and many can be expressed in a single word: freedom; justice; honour; duty; mercy; hope."
  • "It is a mistake to try to look too far ahead. The chain of destiny can only be grasped one link at a time."
  • "Out of intense complexities, intense simplicities emerge."
  • "Courage is what it takes to stand up and speak, it's also what it takes to sit down and listen."
  • "Continuous effort--not strength or intelligence--is the key to unlocking our potential."

Enjoy! 
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Monday, April 30, 2018

National Poetry Month 2018 Draws to Close

April 2018
"Poetry is vocal painting, as painting is silent poetry." --Simonides of Geos*

Amazingly as April and another National Poetry Month draw to a close, I can say I completed the 30-Poems-in-30 Days challenge, and I'm celebrating! Of course now the revision cycle kicks in, so we're not done yet, but the bones of the challenge have been completed. Completed submissions are due in a few days so I have my work cut out for me.

I'm also amazed that this precious bluebird posed long enough on a wire outside our living room window the other day that I could capture his picture (and through the glass no less). All things considered, like poetry, sometimes the best images come in quite unexpected ways.

Any amazing or unexpected things come your way lately?

*And just who was Simonides of Geos? Turns out he was a Greek poet who lived 556-468 B.C. Poetry has been around a long, long time!
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Saturday, April 21, 2018

A Time to Talk by Robert Frost

April 2018
 A Time to Talk
When a friend calls to me from the road
And slows his horse to a meaning walk,
I don't stand still and look around
On all the hills I haven't hoed,
And shout from where I am, What is it?
No, not as there is a time to talk.
I thrust my hoe in the mellow ground,
Blade-end up and five feet tall,
And plod: I go up to the stone wall
For a friendly visit.
--Robert Frost

Happy National Poetry Month! I'm celebrating by continuing the 30-Poems-in-30-Days Challenge (here) and by chronicling some of my favorite poems in a notebook so I don't lose track of them. This poem by Robert Frost is one of them. I'm also celebrating with fellow blogger Elizabeth who commented in my previous post that she has been inspired to take up the challenge, too, and was almost half-way to her goal of 30 poems in 30 days on the day she commented. That's what it's all about--exploring the world of words, encouraging one another, being inspired by friends :-)

Enjoying the month. Enjoying poetry. Enjoying friendships. How about you?
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Friday, March 30, 2018

Crown of Thorns at the Conservatory

Krohn Conservatory March 2018
Crown of Thorns
Euphorbia milii f. lutea
Madagascar
"This schrub was brought to the Middle East for cultivation over 2000 years ago. Legend associates it with the crown of thorns referenced in the Bible worn by Christ. This is also the oldest known plant specimen in Krohn. We can trace it to a cutting provided by a donor's plant originally collected in 1895!"--description on plaque at Krohn Conservatory, Cincinnati

We visited Cincinnati's Krohn Conservatory the other day, hubby and I along with two grandkids, for the conservatory's annual Butterfly Show. This time butterflies from Madagascar were featured. Built in 1933, the conservatory was first known as the Eden Park Greenhouse but was renamed in 1937 for Irwin M. Krohn, Commissioner for the Board of Parks. In the years since, the conservatory has become known for its great variety of rainforest, desert, and exotic plants--over 35,000 plant species from around the world. For sure, one little walkthrough does not do this place justice, with all the species to see and learn about.

It was however the above plant, Crown of Thorns, that caught my attention most, particularly since this week marks the many observances being held though out the Christian world leading up to Easter celebrations this Sunday. Coming upon this plant in this season created a personal bit of space in which to pause, ponder, reflect...

However, the main draw for most people that day was being in the showroom where thousands of butterflies are free to flit, fly, and even land on you if you are so lucky for the experience!

A few captured snaps:




 



Although rainy outside that day, inside was a delight!

Ever the writer (and/or editor), though, my eye caught a misspelling in the description of the Crown of Thorns. The sign itself may be too small to read in the photo, but my copy above is taken directly from the original. Did you catch the error? I wonder how many people viewing the plant in person have noticed the mistake?

And speaking of writing, April is National Poetry Month. Any plans to celebrate? Some resources:
30 Days, 30 Poems Challenge by tweetspeakpoetry

As for me, I'm in at the Local Gems Press Annual Poetry Chapbook Contest, again 30 poems in 30 days, theme-inspired. My chosen format will be...tada...haiku! Wish me luck!

What challenges are you up for in the upcoming month of April? Have you caught any obvious typos or grammar errors somewhere in public lately?
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Monday, March 26, 2018

And You Call This Spring?

on the last Saturday in March 2018
"I wonder if the snow loves the trees and fields, that it kisses them so gently? And then it covers them up snug, you know, with a white quilt; and perhaps it says, 'Go to sleep darlings, till the summer comes again.'"--Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

It was almost like Alice's adventures around here over the weekend, a glorious gift wrapped up in wonder and glee. All that snow at the end of March, coming down in such huge flakes and with unbelievable packing ability...who would have guessed it?  And so the adventure unfolded--filled with sledrides, snowballs, snowmen, three children, their daddy, and a grandpa. The only thing missing was Carroll's March Hare but the fact that the fun all happened in the month of March, when it's supposed to be spring, makes up for the hare's absence.

Classic quote of the day, this from five-year old Ceci: "Building a snow man is hard work. But I'd rather build a snowman than wash the dishes."

A winter wonderland in spring, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, a child's sense of wonder: can we capture some of that wonder in our writing?

It sure beats washing dishes :-)

Any adventures in your life recently? How do you maintain a sense of adventure in your writing? When was the last time you read Alice's Adventures in Wonderland?
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Friday, March 16, 2018

On Return of Books Lent to Friends and Other Special Books

inscription in a favored book on the bookshelf
"On the Return of a Book Lent to A Friend"
I GIVE humble and hearty thanks for the safe return of this book which having endured the perils of my friend's bookcase, and the bookcases of my friend's friends, now returns to me in reasonably good condition.
I GIVE humble and hearty thanks that my friend did not see fit to give this book to his infant as a plaything, nor use it as an ash-tray for his burning cigar, not as a teething-ring for his mastiff.
WHEN I lent this book I deemed it as lost: I was resigned to the bitterness of the long parting: I never thought to look upon its pages again.
BUT NOW that my book is come back to me, I rejoice and am exceeding glad! Bring hither the fatted morocco and let us rebind the volume and set it on the shelf of honour: for this my book was lent, and is returned again.
PRESENTLY, therefore, I may return some of the books that I myself have borrowed." --Christopher Morely, The Haunted Bookshelf

Adah at 16 (1919)
When I came across this Christopher Morley quote, I immediately thought of a book I have on my shelf: The Greatest Story Ever Told, by Fulton Oursler (Doubleday and Co. 1950). This is a cherished book to me not only because of the story it tells but of personal family history related to its specific volume. For, in 1951, my grandmother, Adah Johnson, wrote these words in the flyleaf: "This book is mine. I will gladly loan it to anyone who would like to read it. But please return it. It tells the story of the New Testament so simply and yet so beautifully I wish everybody would read it." --A.E.J.  Truly the book was special to Adah, and one that she would have wanted returned to her if she loaned it out. Having been passed down to me, it holds a special spot on my bookshelf as well. 

And Christopher Morley (American journalist, novelist, essayist and poet,1890-1957), what more might he have had to say said about books? I was not familiar with Christopher Morley's works before, and I've never read his book, The Haunted Bookshop (written in 1919). One reviewer described the book as "primarily a novel of suspense, though throughout it Morley proclaims the value of books." Knowing all this now, maybe I should find myself a copy and check it out.

Want more on Morley's thoughts about books? Goodreads includes additional quotes from The Haunted Bookshop, including:

"That's why I call this place the Haunted Bookshop. Haunted by the ghosts of the books I haven't read. Poor uneasy spirits, they walk and walk around me. There's only one way to lay the ghost of a book, and that is to read it."

"Living in a bookshop is like living in a warehouse of explosives. Those shelves are ranked with the most furious combustibles in the world--the brains of men."

"I wish there could be an international peace conference of booksellers, for (you will smile at this) my own conviction is that the future happiness of the world depends in no small measure on them and on the librarians."

"There is no one so grateful as the man to whom you have given just the book his soul needed and he never knew it."

I don't know if my grandmother ever read any of Christopher Morley's works, but I think she would agree with his ideas, especially that of this last quote. What if we did have a cherished book that we would want returned upon loaning it out but, with its loss, held out the hope that it was just what that person's soul needed? Wouldn't it be worth it?

What book/books are on your shelf that you would hate to part with? Do you have any books passed down to you from previous generations that you treasure? Do you have any books you need to return to someone else? (Ha!)
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Monday, February 26, 2018

History: Only the Tip of the Iceberg

February 2018
"Most human affairs happen without leaving vestiges or records of any kind behind them. The past, having happened, has perished with only occasional traces. To begin with, although the absolute number of historical writings is staggering, only a small part of what happened in the past was ever observed. And only a part of what was observed in the past was remembered by those who observed it; only a part of what was remembered was recorded; only a part of what was recorded has survived; only a part of what survived has come to the historians' attention; only a part of what has come to their attention is credible; only a part of what is credible has been grasped; and only a part of what has been grasped can be expounded or narrated by the historian." --Louis Gottschalk, Understanding History (NY: Knopf, 1969)

Wow, quite the quote to ponder. I came across these words while reading yet another book on Ohio's history: Ulysses Underground, The Unexplored Roots of U.S. Grant and the Underground Railroad, by G.L. Corum (p. 184). Makes me want to get Gottschalk's book and pick his brain a little more about history. What a perspective--profound and yet so amazingly obvious. Of course no one can record and pass on every detail of their lives, most wouldn't even care to. We never truly plumb the depths of our own family histories let alone the grand sweep of centuries. We only see a tiny tip of the great iceberg. Makes me respect historians even more, knowing what all they have to sift through.

I pass this historical cemetery (pictured above) on my morning walk and have done so for many years now. I often ponder what the lives of some of these people in my neighborhood were like 150 years ago. A stroll among the markers reveals the graves of two Civil War veterans along with a Civil War nurse, a marker listing the names of four children on one stone, and a mysterious little gravestone that simply reads "P.W." The grave for the patriarch for which the cemetery is named, John Henry Willsey (1798-1876) is there, as is that of his grandson, also named John Henry Willsey, who was killed in a robbery on his way home from the market in 1916.  Other markers name infants, toddlers, and teenagers as well as the older generations.

Just a bit of history from this little pocket of the world, a tiny sample of the uncountable stories that could be told in neighborhoods everywhere. A few details passed on, many lost. But enduring threads, though invisible and often nameless, carry on from generation to generation don't they? Threads like courage, perseverance, family, discovery, service, sacrifice. Isn't that ultimately what stories of the past teach us-- and inspire us to pass on as well?

What stories from history--family, neighborhood, or otherwise--do you find yourself passing on to others? What strikes you about Gottschalk's quote that you hadn't thought about before?
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